Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365

Celebrity Travel Addicts – Brock of Edges of Earth & SoloTravel365

By: on July 15, 2020 In this edition of , we speak with Brock, the world traveler behind the Edges of Earth YouTube channel and the SoloTravel365 travel blog.
We chat with this modern-day explorer about the quotes he came across that made him want to follow his passion of traveling the world, traveling around different countries with locals, being under COVID-19 lockdown in India, and much more.
Check out his favorite destination s around the globe and find out where he’s off to next.
The first time I traveled out of the country , I was 14 years old.
My parents took me to South Africa for a couple of weeks to go on a Safari.
The following summer, the same South African couple that we previously met, invited me to hang out on their Ranch for the summer.
I visited South Africa again, alone, at age 15 for about 30 days.
2 years later , I traveled back to Africa, this time Zimbabwe, with my parents.
Needless to say, I was bitten by the travel bug – and bitten hard.
In fact, I think it must have burrowed its way down to the bone and never came out.
Traveling to Africa only left me with more quest ions than answers.
I was so intrigued about how and why things were so different than that of the USA, my native country.
When I think back, this must have been the origin of my travel addiction.

Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 overlooking a lake in Udaipur

India.
To be honest – it is not so much that traveling, specifically, is important (for everyone).
I believe that it is important for everybody to follow their own passion in life.
If your passion is to skateboard, awesome, make more time for it.
If your passion is aeronautics, awesome, get your pilot’s license and try to fly as much as possible.
If your passion is cooking, awesome, try to design your life around cooking more often.
In my mind, the key is not simply traveling.
The key is determining your passion, and including more of it in your life.
The only outcome from doing this, is positivity and happiness.
Imagine waking up every morning and doing the one thing that makes you smile.
How awesome would that be.
I think we can all agree that it would be pretty awesome.
I challenge everyone to look deep within themselves to determine their passion, and in addition, create a blueprint that will help you include more of it in your life.
For me, Travel is my passion.
It is my everything.
I wake up every day and go on another adventure which leads me to meet more local people and experience more of the local culture.
I am on Cloud Nine.
Absolute bliss.
To me, travel is everything that I had hoped for only a few years ago.
So for me, personally – yes, travel is definitely important.
You have a very inspiring story when it comes to how you made the decision to start traveling the world solo.
Can you please share it with us?.
In short, following my 26th birthday, I stumbled across these 3 quotes while browsing Facebook, several months apart.
“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life.
When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up.
I wrote down ‘happy’.
They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.” – John Lennon.
“If you keep on doing what you’ve always done, you’ll keep getting what you’ve always got.” – W.
L.
Bateman.
“Fear is temporary, regret is forever.” – Anonymous.
Now as strange as this sounds, these quotes shook my mindset to its core.
I made it a mission to determine what would make me happy, even if I did it for the rest of my life (rich or poor).
After intense thought for about 2 weeks, I determined that traveling the world and experiencing culture would be the ultimate bliss.
Just a few months later I donated everything to Goodwill and started my never-ending adventure.
The full story can be found here.
Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 taking a selfie with villagers along the coast of Gujarat, India (one man invited him to his home for tea afterward)!.
On your YouTube channel, Edges of Earth, something you try to do is travel around the country you’re visiting with a local.
How did that idea come about?.
Good question.
I’m not sure really.
I guess I just fell in love with the idea of traveling deeper within a culture and throwing myself into the unknown.
I guess I feel that the best way to do that is by meeting local people, making friends with them, and sometimes traveling together.
The amount of information that I have learned by simply being around local people, has been unprecedented.
In addition to learning more about the culture, I try my best to film the interaction between me and the local person.
I believe this gives the viewers an idea about the local people.
Things like: What the local people sound like when they speak English, what the local people dress like, what type of body language they have, what their habits are, how they make decisions, the list goes on.
I think it helps to give the viewer a first-hand experience of what it’s like to be in a particular country – which only helps to build their personal confidence about traveling there.
What is something you’ve learned or experienced through traveling with locals that you feel you couldn’t have learned or experienced otherwise?.
It’s hard to simply identify only one.
Traveling with locals helps in so many different ways.
I have been able to go to locations that I would have never thought possible if I was traveling alone.
In the United States, trespassing is a large issue.
In some other countries that I have visited, trespassing doesn’t exist.
The property is owned by the government and therefore you can travel anywhere.
If I was traveling alone, I would have never known this.
Even if I did know this, I would have never been able to build enough courage to walk in certain areas – simply because the fear of trespassing, entering someone’s personal space, or walking in the wrong area is etched deep in my mind.
It doesn’t matter which country I visit, locals are always more fun to be around and they have always been so helpful.

Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 walking through a giant lotus field with locals

You were traveling through the state of Tamil Nadu in southern India when the coronavirus pandemic hit.
What was your experience there like?.
The lockdown situation in Tamil Nadu was definitely an interesting ordeal.
Being that I don’t pay attention to the news, the lockdown happened without me knowing it.
The very first day of lockdown, all of the businesses were closed which left me with an extremely limited supply of food.
I started rationing my food for the first week.
I ate oats and water for breakfast, lunch, dinner.
Crazy.
Soon, small food stalls opened up at certain times of the day, which gave me access to a slightly larger variety of food.
In addition to the food, the Indian Immigration Office is/was rather broken.
Apparently, foreigners were required to submit a large amount of documents to them for visa extension.
It took about seven hours to complete.
After submitting these documents seven different times (over the course of 2 months), they always rejected my application every single time.
The email department said to talk to the phone department, and the phone department said that I needed to listen to the email department.
Nobody would tell me why my paperwork was rejected.
Finally, I simply stopped trying.
The positive side of this lockdown was the amount of time that it has given me.
I have been able to get caught up on so much editing and so many other large tasks.
If the lockdown never happened, I would still be so far behind schedule.
Since December of 2016, I have traveled 365 days per year (hence the name of my website).
I took a small break to make an appearance at a wedding in the United States only once – but I still did lots of traveling while there.
Call me strange, but I enjoy visiting areas that are slightly underdeveloped.
I have found that these areas have had very little impact from Western culture – mainly because they are not tourist areas.
Because of this, their culture is extremely rich and diverse.
Rich culture is what I love.
I think I travel quite a bit slower than most other travelers.
I prefer staying in a country for several months at a time and even up to a year at a time, when possible.
This allows me to familiarize myself with the culture at its deepest level.
I enjoy this method more than bouncing from country to country for only a few weeks at a time.
That would barely give me enough time to experience the culture.
When I can start to predict the actions/reactions of the local people (within multiple different types of scenarios), then I feel culturally accomplished.
It usually takes quite a while to get to that point.
Yes, I am a geek.

Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 exploring the ancient structures of Jodhpur

India.
To be honest, I’m not quite sure.
I generally don’t focus a lot of my YouTube efforts towards teaching people about the local culture.
It’s a little bit strange because that is generally my primary focus while I am there.
The majority of what people will find on my channel is simply me interacting with local people of all types.
Sometimes the locals try to teach me their local language, sometimes they introduce me to different foods, sometimes they bring me to an interesting location, or many other things.
If people browse my YouTube channel, they will simply see the interaction between me and locals in various forms.
I guess I hope that by watching enough videos, the viewers will start to realize that the world isn’t as dangerous as the media portrays.
The majority of people in this world are kind, friendly, welcoming, and caring; even though everyone has different cultures, customs, religions, and languages.
We are all, at the basic core, human.
This is probably the most requested question I’ve ever been asked.
Usually, people want to know the ‘number one’.
I always tell them that it is impossible to choose simply one.
I usually give them the top three.
Your question is perfect.
1st Place – Philippines 1st Place – India / Bangladesh (these felt basically the same to me) 3rd Place – Vietnam I know, I know, there are 2 countries with 1st Place.
That’s because both countries are absolutely amazing.
They have different cultures and they are amazing in different ways.
I do not know how to weigh the differences.
It is important to note that when I rank a country, it is based on the people, specifically.
If the people are kind, caring, friendly, welcoming, and hospitable, then I will fall In love with everything about their country.
Architectural beauty and the beauty of the landscape is barely part of my equation.
Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 holding on for dear life on the back of a motorbike in HCMC, Vietnam.
OMG, this question is like asking a kid in a candy store about his top five favorite pieces of candy – even though he has tried 1,000 different kinds and he has loved them all.
Yikes.
My ‘top places’ are chosen by how many people showed an interest in me and wanted to speak.
Here we go: INDIA: Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh.
Ahmedabad, Rajasthan.
Mount Abu, Rajasthan.
Jaisalmer, Rajasthan.
Tirur, Kerala.
It was really tough to make that list.
It is in order, by the way.
This short video gives you a feel for what it’s like to walk around in India.
I think I am on country number 23 or 24, depending on your definition of a ‘country’.
Wow, another tough question.
I’m not much of a foodie, but here we go: 3) Malai Kofta – India 2) Beef Lok Lak – Cambodia 1) Bánh ít Dẻo  – Vietnam (This is only a dessert.
I ate them for breakfast every day) This has been my favorite food that I have ever tried while traveling the world.
I want to fly back to Vietnam just to eat one.
Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 joining some local men in a Vietnamese village for rice wine and chicken parts.
Again, I’m not much of a foodie.
So this question is difficult.
I usually just eat something relatively healthy for 10 minutes and then keep going.
It’s quite rare that I go to a restaurant to ‘enjoy’ a meal.
Food simply keeps me alive.
That’s how I view it haha.
I do, however, recommend that people try a few famous meals within each country that they visit.
You know what’s crazy.
I started watching a movie that I have never heard of before, and thought it was going to be just another B rated film.
Every minute that passed, I literally couldn’t believe how similar I was to the main character.
The way he spoke, the decisions that he was making, the ideas that he had, his personality…our similarities were unbelievable.
I was on the edge of my seat throughout the entire movie.
I had the most eerie feeling of deja vu throughout the entire movie.
That movie was called Into The Wild.
Yuck.
I hate traveling through airports.
People, crowds, waiting, delays, overpriced food, excessive use of A/C…this list goes on.

Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 at the top of MS University in Baroda

India.
Another tough question.
I spent a total of two months volunteering at an underprivileged school, a tiny village, in the middle of nowhere, in Bihar, India.
I won’t reveal the name.
But if you watch my video series, I’m sure someone could figure it out if they really wanted to know.
Despite most of the students being born into poverty, they all were quite kind, friendly, full of smiles, and high-fives.
Definitely a place I will never forget.
Local people, only.
I am quite strictly a solo traveler.
I have been invited to travel with other foreigners as well as having foreigners who invited themselves to travel with me.
I have declined all of them.
My definition of solo traveling is slightly different, and deeper, than that of other travelers who have talked about the topic.
I feel that if you are traveling with another foreigner, then you are not solo traveling.
But if you are traveling with a local person, then you are still considered a Solo Traveler.
I will break this ‘only travel with locals rule’, if another YouTuber reaches out to me and wants to collaborate for two or three days.
Anything beyond that, will most likely be declined.
Definitely contact me if we are in the same location at the same time.
I have heard that some travelers bring gaming systems along with them (Xbox/PlayStation), play games on their phone, or watch Netflix.
To each their own, I suppose.
For me, the best way to kill time is to simply go outside and travel more haha.
Seriously.
It is, however, very rare that I have free time.
The majority of the time is spent editing videos.
This takes a ridiculously large amount of time.
But if for some reason I am all caught up (which has only happened once in four years [2020 lockdown]), I would simply go out for a walk in the local neighborhood to meet some local people.
I would probably be invited to play a game [in real life] with the local people.
To me, this is so much fun.

Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 soaking in the beauty of Hong Kong

Hmm, exotic.
Not sure.
Basically any place as far away from the tourist area as possible.
Maybe traveling outside of the tourist area is exotic to some people, but to me, this is completely normal.
I feel awkward and out-of-place when I travel to a tourist area.
I guess I’m a bit weird.
The word ‘exotic’ does remind me of a unique story.
I was in Vietnam traveling with a local man on his motorbike when it suddenly started to rain.
We stopped at the nearest coffee shop to stay dry.  As we entered, we were wondering why the coffee price was significantly higher than the normal local price.
It turned out that it was a ‘special’ coffee shop.
You pay a high price for coffee and they will give you and your friend a room with a bed.
They will also give you as much time as you want to ‘drink the coffee’.
The local man and I both felt awkward, but we also thought it was hilarious at the same time.
We actually bought coffee and went inside the room.
A couple of days later we went back and filmed a street food video inside that same room (that video turned out to be hilarious).
If you are only thinking about it, keep in mind that: There will never be a ‘perfect’ time to start traveling.
Never.
We all have stress in our lives, commitments, expectations, social pressure, etc.
You just have to take a leap of faith (a rather big leap, if I may add).
If not now, when.
The best time to start is, and will always be, now.
I recently wrote a couple of massive articles which talk about this very topic.
Important Critical Solo Traveling tips that you should know before you go & when you should start solo traveling.
My best travel advice is to simply be prepared.
There are so many amazing things that you will get to experience while you are traveling the world.
But there are also some negative things as well.
The key is to be aware of the potential negativities.
If you are prepared for them, then they won’t affect you as much.
If you are not prepared, they will hit you blindsided.
Taking a few moments out of your time to learn what you currently don’t know, will be of great benefit to you.
Internet.
Seriously, that’s all I need.
I just need a local SIM card with 4g, and I’m good to go.
Without the internet, I couldn’t communicate to locals (other than with body language…and we all know that can be a bit difficult).
I don’t need A/C.
I don’t need a beautiful house / hotel.
I don’t need new clothes.
I don’t need games.
I am the most basic/simple/plain person you have probably ever met.
I just don’t need much to be happy.
All I want to do is travel to new locations and meet new local people.
That is it.
OK, maybe my camera & laptop for making videos.
So that’s 3 things.
Oh, and clothing – so I don’t get arrested.
There’s 4 ;).
Papua New Guinea has been on my radar for years.
I’ll probably go there when I eventually reach Indonesia.
Every time I have checked prices to fly into Papua New Guinea, it has been unbelievably expensive.
So, I just figured that I would wait until I am in the neighborhood and simply cross the border or something.
From the outside looking in, it appears that there are a lot of places in which the people are one-with-nature.
They live a very rustic and underdeveloped lifestyle.
For some reason, I am intrigued by ancient culture and basic human instincts.
Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365 Watching the sunset over a river in a small village in Bangladesh.
“Your time is running out.

Start living!” – EdgesOfEarth (me) Somewhere along my YouTube journey

this quote popped into my head.
I now say it at the end of almost every video.
I realized that many people spend their whole lifetime helping to achieve the dreams of someone else (their boss).
And it usually isn’t until old age until most people discover that they have spent their whole lifetime prioritizing someone else’s life, rather than their own.
Sad fact, indeed.
Why not consider taking your life back.
Why not consider creating a life that is geared towards you and your own personal goals/aspirations.
Food for thought.
With every passing day, the window of opportunity becomes smaller and smaller (time is running out).
If you don’t treat your own goals seriously, nobody else will.
If not now, when.
Where do you hope to travel after the pandemic is over?.
My ticket was booked for Sri Lanka, and it has been canceled so many times that I have lost count.
After Sri Lanka, I will stay in Delhi, India for a few months, and then I will be off to Pakistan – if all goes well.
Brock of Edges of Earth and SoloTravel365.
Brock is a Solo Travel Vlogger and has been on the road since June of 2016.
You can usually find him far away from the tourist areas hanging out with the locals.
When he’s not wandering around villages, he is usually behind his computer editing his latest video.
You can learn more about Brock and his travels on his website and YouTube channel, and don’t forget to follow him on Instagram and Facebook as well.
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Never go to Kruger on a South African school holiday

October 30, 2018November 27, 2019.
by.
A Self Driving Safari in South Africa is Affordable!.
A Self Driving Safari in South Africa is the Most Affordable Option and the BEST Way.
This post is about my experience doing a self driving safari in September 2018 in Kruger National Park, one of the best parks for wildlife in the world.
Yes, it’s affordable but I think it’s not only affordable, it truly is the best way to go on safari period.
A Leopard After Her Lunch on Our Self Driving Safari in Kruger An African safari is a bucket-list item for many travelers.
Most people think it’s a trip that can cost upwards of $10,000 per person or more, so therefore will always remain on the bucket list .
Bob and I have good friends who stayed at the renowned Londolozi Lodge in Sabi Sand Reserve that adjoins Kruger.
Londolozi Lodge costs from $869-1,660 per person per night depending on the room.
Honestly, that’s what I thought a safari would cost until I really started researching the topic and I learned it can cost much less.
Before I begin about our safari trip, let me start by saying that everyone I’ve ever talked to about their safari was extremely satisfied.
Whether someone went to a small private safari park just outside Capetown or Johannesburg, or a luxury game reserve like Londolozi, or self-catered at a national park , everyone loved their experience.

This post is mainly about how to plan a self driving Kruger safari

In a separate post I’ll write about the rest of our trip in South Africa.
If you have the time, I recommend a minimum of two weeks for a trip to South Africa and a minimum of 3-4 days of your trip in Kruger on safari.
How Cheap Can a Safari Be.
In my research planning our trip, South Africa seemed to be the cheapest place to go on a safari compared to other African countries.
In addition, South Africa has a lot of other things we like to see and do like wine tasting and whale watching, so it would provide a really varied vacation experience for us.
Before I get into details, let me provide you with the bottom line cost for two people: Six nights of accommodation in Kruger, 2 professional ranger-guided safari drives, one ranger-guided safari morning walk, a Wild Card pass for entrance into the park and food–$1,148.
Consider this–no matter how much money you spend, no matter where you stay, everyone is looking at the same animals.
For the most part, it’s the amount of luxury you desire (or require!) that drives up the cost of your safari.
Of course, your next big expense is transportation.
In our case, we used American Airlines points plus $248 in taxes for our air tickets but you can often find coach airfare from the U.
S.
to Johannesburg for under $1000 round trip.
Our rental car for two weeks plus gas and tolls was under $300.
So with advanced planning, a one week Safari can cost about $1,700 per person if you get a credit card sign up bonus for the airfare, or cost about $2,700 per person without using miles/points if you mange to find a cheap coach ticket.
Of course, this amount will vary depending on the time of the year of your trip, home airport, etc.
We traveled in September, which is shoulder season in South Africa and we enjoyed a strong U.
S.
dollar compared to the South African rand.
(US$1 to ZA$14-15) Our First Watering Hole within Minutes of Driving into Kruger on our Self Driving Safari The Difference Between a Private Reserve and Kruger National Park.
Researching our trip, initially I was very confused about what a reserve is compared to a national park.
Honestly, it wasn’t completely clear to me until I arrived in South Africa.

Surrounding much of the South African side of Kruger National Park

there are several private reserves with open borders to Kruger, meaning you go on ranger drives within the reserve’s land but animals move freely between all the connected reserves and Kruger.
These reserves attached to Kruger are considered “the greater Kruger area.” Each reserve has a number of lodges either owned by the same company or different companies.
Before our self-guided safari in Kruger, we went to a lodge in Klaserie Private Reserve for a professionally guided safari for 2 nights.
Our lodge had a “sister” lodge nearby in the same reserve but it was more expensive because that lodge offered a more posh experience.
Game drives with each lodge went over the same land.
Think of lodges in reserves like the variety of hotel brands near Disney World.
For example, within the Marriott brand, you can have a Ritz-Carlton, Marriott and Courtyard by Marriott all located within a few miles of each other at very different price points but everyone is enjoying Disney World.
In addition to private reserves with open borders to Kruger and other national parks, there are private reserves completely detached from any national park.
The animals in this type of private reserve are confined to wandering within that reserve only.
Some of these reserves can be rather small and while they may have all the Big Five animals, their numbers would be smaller.
That said, almost everyone we met saw all of the Big Five no matter what kind of reserve they visited, lodge they stayed in or did their own self-drive safari.
So Many Elephants.

We Saw At Least 100 or More on Our Self Driving Safari in Kruger How Do You “Self Drive

Self Guide” a Safari.
When I heard about driving on your own on a safari, I assumed it must be incredibly dangerous and very difficult to find animals because nobody is helping you find them.
In fact, it’s extremely easy to do a self-guided, self-drive safari in Kruger.
If you can drive a car, you can do it.
The network of roads within Kruger is fantastic, easily driven on with an economy car.
Even most of the dirt roads are in good condition.
(We drove on a few that were very bumpy but driveable.) The number of animals in Kruger is amazing!.
We visited in mid-September and within minutes of entering the park, we saw dozens of animals.
Within the first hour’s drive we saw many elephants, giraffes, Cape buffalo, impalas, zebras, wildebeest and much more.
Many of these animals are just a few feet from your car.
During our six days in Kruger on our own, rarely did we go more than 20 minutes without seeing animals.
We saw all the Big Five (some of them many times) and the only animal we didn’t see that we wanted to was wild dogs.
This Lion is Only 15 Feet from Our Car.
His Mate and Several Cubs Wandered Nearby.
Accommodations for a Self Guided, Self Drive Safari.
Within Kruger there are 12 rest camps.
Each camp is surrounded by an electrified fence to keep the animals out.
All accommodations, shops and restaurants are within the fenced area.
You have to be inside your camp gate by 6:00 p.m.
and the gate reopens at 6:00 a.m.
You can walk within a camp without worrying about dangerous animals.
Each camp has basic but comfortable relatively cheap accommodations.
We stayed at three different camps for two nights each.
All camps have bungalows and a campground, and some have permanent tents.
We wanted air conditioning because September is hot–in fact, we had several days with temperatures over 100 degrees–so we opted for bungalows and we were so glad we did.
Our thatched bungalows in Satara and Berg-en-Dal rest camps had a private bathroom with shower and very comfortable beds.
Our bungalow in Lower Sabie didn’t have a private bathroom so we had to use a (clean) communal bathroom about 100 feet away.
None of the bungalows were in any way luxurious but all were clean, quiet and reasonably comfortable.

Here is the link to the Kruger National Park website where you book accommodations

The Cost of Our Kruger Accommodations:

Two nights in Satara Rest Camp $165 Two nights in Lower Sabie Rest Camp $81 Two nights in Berg-en-Dal Rest Camp $168 Inside Our Bungalow at Satara Rest Camp Our Lower Sabie Bungalow–Not the Best but it was the Cheapest Our Bungalow in Berg-en-Dal was the Best Food in Kruger National Park.
Kruger rest camps each have at least one, if not several, affordable restaurants so you don’t even have to self-cater.
We self-catered lunches with peanut butter, crackers and fruit we purchased outside the park and brought with us in the car during our drives.
The food at camp restaurants was pretty good and offered a range of options from salads, burgers and wraps, to steaks and ribs.
There were quite a few menu options for vegetarians, although not much for vegans.
In general we found the starter/appetizer portions are large enough to be a main course, and the main courses usually large enough for us to share.
Kruger also has some cafes and shops located at rest areas (actually called “Alighting Points”) along main roads within the park convenient for lunch and snacks but with limited food options.
When we were there it was over 100 degrees and these rest areas became daily ice cream bar breaks.
And yes, there are toilets for bathroom breaks.
Remember, you can’t g et out of your car unless you are in an official camp or rest area so you have to plan a bit in advance for your breaks.
Another Option for a Self-Guided, .

Self-Driving Safari…A Hotel Outside Kruger Gate

The entire national park has 9 gates in different areas to enter and exit.
The main gate is Kruger Gate, which has a cluster of hotels outside the gate and a large rest camp just inside the gate.
We met several people who stayed at the Protea Hotel Kruger Gate (part of the Marriott family) and drove into the park during the day for animal viewing.
One couple spent about a year accumulating Marriott points for a 7-night certificate including room and airfare.
Another couple spent just two nights at the Protea and then a few nights in the park at rest camps.
The Protea Hotel Kruger Gate isn’t cheap but might be an option for those who really don’t want to spend money to stay in a camp and would rather use points to stay for free or for people who don’t want to spend a lot at a lodge in a private reserve yet still want a bit of luxury.
(I looked up the price at the Protea and our dates were $275 per night for a double.) The main negative I see about staying at a hotel outside the park is that you are limited to seeing animals only around that gate unless you plan on driving a whole lot and doing a lot of back tracking covering the same roads every day in and out of the same gate.
For example, we started at a camp in the middle of Kruger and made our way down to the southern-most portion of the park by the last two nights of our trip where most of the hippos tend to be located.
Keep in mind Kruger is vast and speed limits are slow so realistically you are only covering about 100 miles because you will want to pull over and watch the animals all the time.

Game Drives & Game Walks Within Kruger

Some people think you have to stay at a private lodge to get game drives by expert trackers and naturalists…NOT TRUE.
Kruger offers game drives and morning game walks from the rest camps.
We did several during our stay and they were every bit as good as those we did in the private reserve.
Our groups were small (6-10 people) and our rangers very knowledgeable.
On average the game drives were $20 per person and our walk was $36 per person.
We did two sunset game drives, which were great because they start at 4:30 p.m.
and end about 8 p.m.
so you get to see animals at dusk and nocturnal animals after sunset.
Personally, I wouldn’t bother with the evening drives that start later; our rangers said sunset drives see more animals than night drives.
We particularly enjoyed our morning game walks because it’s really something unique to be on the ground walking through the expansive savanna following tracks, discovering trails of blood, walking past bleached bones and coming fairly close to animals while on foot with nothing between you and nature.
The walks are about 3 miles long and leave very early in the morning before first light but I highly recommend going on at least one.
Here is the link to the activities you can book in advance on the Kruger National Park website.
Planning Your Trip…Start Early.
If you want to stay in Kruger or just outside the main gate, you have to start planning very early.
I booked our flights close to 330 days in advance (American Airlines AAdvantage rule) and then immediately booked our Kruger accommodations.
We went in mid-September, which I felt was a great time to go because it’s considered shoulder season and wasn’t during a South African school holiday.
When we checked into each camp I asked if there were any last minute bungalows available and there never were so I would not even think about hoping to show up and get accommodations.
In fact, the day we left the park was the first day of a school holiday and the line of cars at the gate to get into the park was about 50 cars long.
Never go to Kruger on a South African school holiday.
We Saw Dozens of Giraffes but it’s Very Special to See The Babies.

Booking Your Safari on the Kruger Website

The Kruger National Park website has a ton of information on it

almost too much.
You can book your own accommodations and game drives and walks online and pay by credit card.
You have to start an account and then you can book rest camps.
I wasn’t choosy about the bungalows I picked because I didn’t really know how the camps were laid out anyway so I chose by the cheapest bungalow available.
Booking the activities like game drives was more difficult because you are not allowed to go on a sunset or evening game drive on the same day you arrive in a rest camp; you can only book an activity on your second day at the rest camp.
The website indicates this but not very clearly.
Also, be very careful because several private companies have websites that look official but they are not the actual Kruger National Park website–my link above is the actual website.
The Cost of Entrance into the Park.
We Bought a Wild Card.

Kruger National Park charges a fee to enter

Daily fees are approximately $22 for adults and $11 for children.
For multiple days, it might make more sense to buy a Wild Card with access to Kruger and most national parks in South Africa for a whole year.
For one person the Wild Card (for non-South Africans) costs approximately $163 but it’s a better deal for 2 people at approximately $255.
A family Wild Card is available for 2 adults and up to five children under 18 for $305.
You don’t have to be related for the couple or family Wild Cards.
We had the luxury of 30 days in South Africa so I planned extra time in Johannesburg to get over our jet lag before getting our rental car and driving to Kruger.
We spent 5 nights in Johannesburg using Hilton points at the Sandton Hilton which is too much time for most people but we both caught a cold from the plane in addition to 48 hours of travel time getting from LA to Johannesburg so we really needed the down time before the safari portion of our trip started.
Which Did We Like Better, our Private Safari or Self Guided.
We enjoyed our experience at Africa on Foot in Klaserie Private Reserve but I’m glad we did it prior to Kruger.
We saw quite a few animals in Klaserie and our guides and trackers were excellent but we saw more animals in Kruger and our guides and trackers were equally good.
Africa on Foot enabled us to relax during the day and to socialize with other travelers in a communal type of experience.
While in Kruger we were quite tired from driving a lot and being out all day and some nights looking at animals, and we didn’t really meet many people because everyone is going out on their own.
If budget was a bigger concern, .

I would skip the private reserve and opt for self-guided within Kruger National Park

Our time in Kruger was magical and we felt a spirit of adventure being on our own that we didn’t feel being guided and catered to in the private lodge.
I’m glad we had both experiences but if we ever go back, we will only do a self-guided safari in Kruger.
My next blog post will be about the rest of our trip in South Africa.
Overall, our month in South Africa was one of our most unique and diverse trips we have ever taken.
Posted in Cheap Travel in Africa, Tagged affordable safari, do it yourself safari, kruger self drive safari, self drive safari, self driving safari Club Wyndham Timeshare Presentation Scam How to Go Wine Tasting in the Douro Valley on Your Own–Don’t Do It.
AinsleeKayes November 7, 2018 at 5:39 AM In the north of the country, close to the Botswana border and a 3?-hour drive from Lanseria airport, the family-owned and run Mosetla Bush Camp and Eco Lodge , in the malaria-free, game-rich Madikwe reserve, offers great value for money and reliable game viewing year-round.
This rustic camp has no electricity and is lit at night by romantic paraffin lamps; water is provided by wood-fired “donkey boilers”.
The fence around the camp keeps the elephants out, but sightings of hyena, civet and buffalo around the huts are common.
Rates are at about ?1ppn.
This includes two ranger-guided safaris and three meals a day.
Micah Esparza March 11, 2019 at 5:42 AM Great stuff.
Here’s our blog: http://safari.casa.
??.
November 20, 2019 at 9:47 PM Love wilde animals in Africa.
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A Self Driving Safari in South Africa is Affordable.
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Mozambique is a malaria destination

Mozambique Hunting Guide .

Use the guide below to help you plan your hunting trip to Mozambique

Hunting in Mozambique .

Our hunting season in Mozambique is from 15th May to 30th November

The Niassa Reserve falls within the subtropical region of the country and receives on aver age 1000mm (40”) rain per year.
The rainy season coincides with the heat and humidity from December th rough April.
Winter, which is the dry season, stretches from May to mid- September and this is then also the coolest time to visit the country.
Average day temperature ranges between 20°C and 30°C (68°F and 86°F).
Animals become more visible from May through to November as the bush dries out and they tend to congre gate close to water sources.
August, September and October are the best months to hunt for predators while November is very good for buffalo as it is the driest time of the year.
We are very specific with what we hunt, no buffalo or sable hunting is done in the herds, only lone bulls or groups of bulls are perused.
Sable bulls must show secondary growth of 1” at the base of the horn, which ensures that they are over 7 years of age.
With regards to the hunting of leopard and lion, we adhere to a strict protocol which ensures that we hunt these animals sustainably.
If you are after a daytime leopard, the best time to hunt them is before the end of August.
Hunting is allowed at night, with artificial light, but only for lion, leopard, crocodile and bushpig.
Hunting of female, young and/or im mature animals is prohibited.
Each hunter is allowed to bring a maximum of three firearms to Mozambique with a maximum of 100 rounds of ammunition per firearm.
The airline’s restriction is 11lbs of ammunition.
No automatic , semi-automatic or military grade firearms are allowed.
We recommend the minimum calibre to be used on thick skinned game is a .375 and recommend clients bring 20 soft rounds and 20 solid rounds.
For general plains game, we recommend a calibre in the .300 range with 40-60 rounds of ammunition.

Bowhunting is allowed in Mozambique and is currently legal during the hunting season

All species may be t ak en with a bow.
Should a hunter wish not to bring his/her own rifle on the safari, there are camp rifles and ammunition available for their use at an additional cost.
Each hunter is required, by law, to have a hunting licence before a firearm import permit will be issued.
Furthermore, due to small quota allocations per area, a client needs to reserve animals (including plains game) upon booking the safari.
Permits are issued for each trophy before the commencement of the safari.
Non-reserved animals may be taken if available but will incur a 50% surcharge on top of the Government Licence fee to cover the costs of late application fees and courier fees of licences to Pemba.
There is daily laundry done in camp.
Below is a packing list to get you prepared for your Mozambican safari: 3 x T-shirts.
2 x long sleeve shirts (khaki or olive green).
1 x sweatshirt / fleece.
1 x warm jacket (khaki or olive green).
2 x pairs of comfortable shorts.
2 x pairs of cotton trousers / pants (khaki or olive green).
4 x pairs of socks and underwear.
1 x belt.
1 x hat / cap.
Swimsuit.
Lightweight, durable, waterproof hiking shoes / boots.
Flip flops, .

Sandals or Teva’s for around camp

Personal documentation: Passport, airline tickets, rifle import documentation, invitation letters, emergency contact list and copies of all documents.
Personal items: Cash (clean/unmarked notes, 2009 or newer), toiletries, sunglasses, reading glasses, any prescribed medication (if applicable), sunscreen, cellphone and iPad charger, power adapter (Local power 220V) and leisure reading books.
Hunting gear: camera, knife, ammo belt, binoculars, telescope, hunting backpack, flashlight, hunting gaiters or leggings and insect repellent (Skin so Soft by Avon is recommended).
Malaria prophylactics.

The closest port of entry to the Niassa Reserve is Pemba International Airport (POL)

We recommend that hunters fly via OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg

to Pemba directly on SA Airlink.
There is one flight per day (none on Sundays and Tuesdays).
A Chapungu-Kambako representative will meet and assist each client on arrival at Pemba airport.
Clients will travel in a light aircraft from here to camp.
It is advisable to make use of a travel agent when booking your international flights to Africa.
Miriam Clingensmith at Frosch travel agency can assist with any flight bookings ( / +1 713-590-8138).
She is also available to meet in person at the DSC and SCI shows.
Overnighting in Johannesburg.
Some flights via Johannesburg require you to overnight in Johannesburg before catching the SA Airlink flight to Pemba the following morning.
We strongly recommend using Afton Guest House for your accommodation and for processing your South African firearm intransit permit.
Travellers to Mozambique must have a valid passport with validity of not less than six months and a Visa (to be applied for 60 days before the safari from the Mozambique Embassy in the hunter’s respective country).
It is important to note that all hunting safaris are potentially dangerous and it is each client’s own responsibility to arrange his/her medical, evacuation or personal insurance.
We recommend Ripcord Comprehensive Travel Protection () as a preferred travel insurer.
It is advisable to take out full insurance for all firearms before travelling anywhere in Africa.
Ensure that your ammunition is in a separate lockable container from your rifle.
It is legal for hunters to import bows for bowhunting purposes into Mozambique and no import permit is required.

A valid firearm import permit is required before any hunter arrives in Mozambique

We assist with the application thereof and every hunter must provide us, at least 12 weeks before the commencement of the safari, with a scanned colour copy of his/her passport, a colour copy of a passport size photograph in .jpeg format, a copy of the US Customs form 4457 or Firearm License from your home country, the travel itinerary and the completed Client Information Sheet.
Clients visiting or travelling through South Africa (depending on the airline in-transit regulations) will need to complete a South Africa Firearms Permit Application Form (SAPS 520) and obtain the permit prior to their arrival.
Please check with your travel agent or airline about the transit procedure when travelling through South Africa.
For more information please see our.
All skins are washed in bactericide and dry salted while skulls are boiled, cleaned and peroxided in camp.
At the end of the hunting season (end of November), representatives from the Niassa Reserve Management inspect and measure all trophies in camp.

Thereafter a transport permit is issued to transport the trophies from camp to Pemba

Once in Pemba, all trophies undergo inspection by representatives from the Ministry of Tourism, Agriculture and Veterinary and permits are issued to transport the trophies from Pemba to Maputo/Matola.
From here, Safari Air Cargo apply for the final export permits and once issued, .

The trophies are transported to Life-Form Taxidermy in South Africa

This is the closest registered veterinary-accepted handling facility in South Africa for Mozambique trophies.
At Life Form, all trophies are once more inspected before either being shipped to each hunter’s preferred taxidermist abroad or we recommend to have the trophies mounted at Life Form Taxidermy (www.lifeformtaxidermy.com).
Mozambique is a malaria destination, so it is advisable to take malaria prophylactics before arriving in the country.
Adequate clothing as well as mosquito repellent are important to minimize mosquito bites.
Tsetse flies are also found in the area, .

But pose little to no risk of acquiring African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness)

Each hunter is advised to bring a small personal medical kit with necessary preferred medication for headaches, colds, burns, allergies etc.
Hunting in Mozambique.
Our hunting season in Mozambique is from 15th May to 30th November.
The Niassa Reserve falls within the subtropical region of the country and receives on average 1000mm (40”) rain per year.
The rainy season coincides with the heat and humidity from December through April.
Winter, which is the dry season, stretches from May to mid-September and this is then also the coolest time to visit the country.
Average day temperature ranges between 20°C and 30°C (68°F and 86°F).
Animals become more visible from May through to November as the bush dries out and they tend to congregate close to water sources.
August, September and October are the best months to hunt for predators while November is very good for buffalo as it is the driest time of the year.
We are very specific with what we hunt, no buffalo or sable hunting is done in the herds, only lone bulls or groups of bulls are perused.
Sable bulls must show secondary growth of 1” at the base of the horn, which ensures that they are over 7 years of age.
With regards to the hunting of leopard and lion, we adhere to a strict protocol which ensures that we hunt these animals sustainably.
If you are after a daytime leopard, the best time to hunt them is before the end of August.
Hunting is allowed at night, with artificial light, but only for lion, leopard, crocodile and bushpig.
Hunting of female, young and/or immature animals is prohibited.
Each hunter is allowed to bring a maximum of three firearms to Mozambique with a maximum of 100 rounds of ammunition per firearm.
The airline’s restriction is 11lbs of ammunition.
No automatic, semi-automatic or military grade firearms are allowed.
We recommend the minimum calibre to be used on thick skinned game is a .375 and recommend clients bring 20 soft rounds and 20 solid rounds.
For general plains game, we recommend a calibre in the .300 range with 40-60 rounds of ammunition.
Bowhunting is allowed in Mozambique and is currently legal during the hunting season.
All species may be taken with a bow.
Should a hunter wish not to bring his/her own rifle on the safari, there are camp rifles and ammunition available for their use at an additional cost.
Each hunter is required, by law, to have a hunting licence before a firearm import permit will be issued.
Furthermore, due to small quota allocations per area, a client needs to reserve animals (including plains game) upon booking the safari.
Permits are issued for each trophy before the commencement of the safari.
Non-reserved animals may be taken if available but will incur a 50% surcharge on top of the Government Licence fee to cover the costs of late application fees and courier fees of licences to Pemba.
There is daily laundry done in camp.
Below is a packing list to get you prepared for your Mozambican safari: 3 x T-shirts.
2 x long sleeve shirts (khaki or olive green).
1 x sweatshirt / fleece.
1 x warm jacket (khaki or olive green).
2 x pairs of comfortable shorts.
2 x pairs of cotton trousers / pants (khaki or olive green).
4 x pairs of socks and underwear.
1 x belt.
1 x hat / cap.
Swimsuit.
Lightweight, durable, waterproof hiking shoes / boots.
Flip flops, sandals or Teva’s for around camp.
Personal documentation: Passport, airline tickets, rifle import documentation, invitation letters, emergency contact list and copies of all documents.
Personal items: Cash (clean/unmarked notes, 2009 or newer), toiletries, sunglasses, reading glasses, any prescribed medication (if applicable), sunscreen, cellphone and iPad charger, power adapter (Local power 220V) and leisure reading books.
Hunting gear: camera, knife, ammo belt, binoculars, telescope, hunting backpack, flashlight, hunting gaiters or leggings and insect repellent (Skin so Soft by Avon is recommended).
Malaria prophylactics.
The closest port of entry to the Niassa Reserve is Pemba International Airport (POL).
We recommend that hunters fly via OR Tambo International Airport in Johannesburg, .

To Pemba directly on SA Airlink

There is one flight per day (none on Sundays and Tuesdays).
A Chapungu-Kambako representative will meet and assist each client on arrival at Pemba airport.
Clients will travel in a light aircraft from here to camp.
It is advisable to make use of a travel agent when booking your international flights to Africa.
Miriam Clingensmith at Frosch travel agency can assist with any flight bookings ( / +1 713-590-8138).
She is also available to meet in person at the DSC and SCI shows.
Overnighting in Johannesburg.
Some flights via Johannesburg require you to overnight in Johannesburg before catching the SA Airlink flight to Pemba the following morning.
We strongly recommend using Afton Guest House for your accommodation and for processing your South African firearm intransit permit.
Travellers to Mozambique must have a valid passport with validity of not less than six months and a Visa (to be applied for 60 days before the safari from the Mozambique Embassy in the hunter’s respective country).
It is important to note that all hunting safaris are potentially dangerous and it is each client’s own responsibility to arrange his/her medical, evacuation or personal insurance.
We recommend Ripcord Comprehensive Travel Protection () as a preferred travel insurer.
It is advisable to take out full insurance for all firearms before travelling anywhere in Africa.
Ensure that your ammunition is in a separate lockable container from your rifle.
It is legal for hunters to import bows for bowhunting purposes into Mozambique and no import permit is required.

A valid firearm import permit is required before any hunter arrives in Mozambique

We assist with the application thereof and every hunter must provide us, at least 12 weeks before the commencement of the safari, with a scanned colour copy of his/her passport, a colour copy of a passport size photograph in .jpeg format, a copy of the US Customs form 4457 or Firearm License from your home country, the travel itinerary and the completed Client Information Sheet.
Clients visiting or travelling through South Africa (depending on the airline in-transit regulations) will need to complete a South Africa Firearms Permit Application Form (SAPS 520) and obtain the permit prior to their arrival.
Please check with your travel agent or airline about the transit procedure when travelling through South Africa.
For more information please see our.
All skins are washed in bactericide and dry salted while skulls are boiled, cleaned and peroxided in camp.
At the end of the hunting season (end of November), representatives from the Niassa Reserve Management inspect and measure all trophies in camp.
Thereafter a transport permit is issued to transport the trophies from camp to Pemba.
Once in Pemba, all trophies undergo inspection by representatives from the Ministry of Tourism, Agriculture and Veterinary and permits are issued to transport the trophies from Pemba to Maputo/Matola.
From here, Safari Air Cargo apply for the final export permits and once issued, the trophies are transported to Life-Form Taxidermy in South Africa.
This is the closest registered veterinary-accepted handling facility in South Africa for Mozambique trophies.
At Life Form, all trophies are once more inspected before either being shipped to each hunter’s preferred taxidermist abroad or we recommend to have the trophies mounted at Life Form Taxidermy (www.lifeformtaxidermy.com).
Mozambique is a malaria destination, so it is advisable to take malaria prophylactics before arriving in the country.
Adequate clothing as well as mosquito repellent are important to minimize mosquito bites.
Tsetse flies are also found in the area, but pose little to no risk of acquiring African trypanosomiasis (sleeping sickness).
Each hunter is advised to bring a small personal medical kit with necessary preferred medication for headaches, colds, burns, allergies etc.
Big Game Hunting.
Plains Game Hunting.
Our Team.
Trophy Gallery.
Testimonials.
Preferred Suppliers.
Botswana Hunting Guide.
Mozambique Hunting Guide.
Namibia Hunting Guide.
South Africa Hunting Guide.
Uganda Hunting Guide.
Zimbabwe Hunting Guide.
Botswana.
Trophy Quest CH8 Camp.
Mozambique.
Kambako Camp.
Litule Camp.
Pemba Beach Lodge.
Namibia.
Caprivi Camp.
Lindenhof Game Ranch.
South Camp.
South Africa.
Kalahari Oryx Private Nature Reserve.
Uganda.
Aswa Lolim.
Kafu River Basin.
Karamoja-North.
Zimbabwe.
Binga – Lake Kariba.
Kazuma Camp.
Tsholotsho South.

Cape Town is South Africa’s beautiful playground

MenuCape Town Travel Guide .

Photo Courtesy of Michael Jansen why you should visit Cape Town now

Cape Town is South Africa ’s beautiful playground.
With its combination of stunning natural landscapes, the large, cultural ly diverse population, and bright African sunshine, Cape Town is a place where time slows and life is savored.
Every now and then, you’ll catch a sobering glimpse of the extent of the city’s population living below the poverty line, and you’re reminded that transition doesn’t happen overnight.
Visitors are bound to feel the all-encompassing warm spirit that transcends any historical hardship, and will gain a fond appreciation of South Africa ’s Mother City.
Read More What to know before you go to Cape Town When’s the best time to go to to Cape Town?.
Cape Town has a Mediterranean climate and is an enjoyable place to visit year-round.
In the summer (November–January), be prepared for dry, hot days.
Late August th rough September sees the arrival of bountiful, colorful flowers in the Western Cape.
February may be warm, but the strong wind known as the Cape Doctor picks up and can make for rough seas and unpredictable weather on Table Mountain.
March is a pleasant time to visit, when a small amount of autumn foliage is visible and days are sunny and comfortable .
If sightseeing in the winter, pack your umbrella and waterproof fleece, because it’s likely you’ll see rain showers during your visit.

Read More How to get around Cape Town

Some major airlines (KLM, Emirates, Virgin Atlantic.

And South African Airways) fly direct to Cape Town from Europe

while others will require you to transfer in Johannesburg.
Give yourself at least two hours for this transfer, so you’ll have time to pass through immigration, collect your bags, recheck them after customs, and then proceed to board your domestic flight to Cape Town.
Cape Town International Airport is located 12 miles (20 kilometers) east of the city center.
Options for transport include the MyCiTi Bus, rental cars, or metered cabs.
Some cabs will negotiate a flat rate, but will run around R300 to R400 (between $21 and $28) to get there.
Though most Capetonians drive everywhere, Cape Town is an extremely walkable city.
If you’re short on time, you’ll likely spend most of it in the City Bowl, .

The part of central Cape Town encapsulated by Table Mountain

With more time to explore, branch out and visit the variety of suburbs surrounding the city and down the Cape Peninsula.
Some, such as Hout Bay, are easier accessed by car, and others, like Kalk Bay, are a scenic train ride away.
Most shops, hotels, and bars are located on or near Long Street and at the V&A Waterfront.
Walking is generally safe, but the city center can be very quiet on the weekends, so stick to the main roads.
A bicycle is a great way to get around, and dedicated bike paths are being created.
Public transport is usually safe to use during the day, especially during commuting hours.
Minibus taxis can be a cramped and hair-raising experience, but they’re a cheap way to travel from the Southern Suburbs into the City Bowl.
The Golden Arrow buses run along the same route.
MetroRail trains run regularly and offer a choice of fare—first or third class (with no major difference in comfort).
When driving a rental car, remember to drive on the left.
Stoplights operate the way American lights do but are called “robots.” Park your rental car in a secure, gated area overnight (if possible), and never leave belongings or valuables visible.
Car guards work in most parking areas and streets, so don’t forget to carry some small change for a tip when you return (up to R10, around 70 cents).

Read More Can’t Miss things to do in Cape Town

It’s hard not to notice the large population living in poverty in Cape Town.
As visitors, there is a natural curiosity about what life is like in a city township.
While it’s not recommended to visit a township your own, you can book tours with responsible providers who employ local township residents to guide small groups on insightful, interactive visits. Simon’s Town, a small port directly outside of Cape Town, was long connected to the slave trade and a tour by AFAR’s partner, Context Tours, can illuminate through the charming town’s (and South Africa’s) dark past.

Read More Food and Drink to try in Cape Town

Cape Town is, without a doubt, the culinary capital of South Africa.
With such a diverse mix of cultures colliding in this city, this is not the time to go on a diet.
The standard international fares are available, but be sure to try local delicacies such as juicy karoo lamb, along with South Africa’s best local wines, perhaps a rich pinot noir or fruity chenin blanc.
South African dishes include bobotie (an eggy, savory curried meat dish) or potjiekos (a beef or vegetable stew cooked in a cast-iron pot over a fire).
If staying with friends or relatives, you’ll likely be invited to a braai (BBQ) and have a chance to try boerwors, which are long, round sausages.
For dessert, try the malva pudding (rich, sticky, and sweet) or the melk tart (creamy custard pie).
Biltong, when done right, is the most savory and tender beef jerky you’ll ever have.
Craft beer is surging in popularity.
You might want to take home a bottle of Amarula, a sweet liquor made from the marula fruit and the essential ingredient of the Springbok shooter (shot), a must-try for first-time visitors in South Africa.
Read More Culture in Cape Town.
A multicultural melting pot, Cape Town is rich in cultural highlights, with facets ranging from politics to design to sports.
First, discover how apartheid laws changed the landscape of Cape Town by visiting the District Six museum, named after the area where more than 60,000 people were forcibly removed from the city.
Next, take the ferry to Robben Island and tour the facility with a former prison inmate to see where Nelson Mandela and other famous political exiles spent their days at back-breaking work in the quarry.
Walk through the Bo Kaap neighborhood, filled with colorful row houses and steeped in the culture of the Cape Malay (one of many ethnic groups you’ll encounter in the city).

Cheer on the Ajax Cape Town football team at the Green Point Stadium

a landmark from South Africa’s 2010 World Cup games.
Similarly, take in a cricket or rugby game at the sporting venues in Newlands in the Southern Suburbs.
There is always something going on in Cape Town, though the winter months (June–September) are quieter.
Family events include the South African Navy Festival in April, which allows visitors to tour South African naval ships for free in Simonstown, and the Hermanus Whale Festival in September.
Two large sporting events are the Two Oceans Marathon (Easter weekend) and the Cape Argus Cycle Tour (early March).
While it’s fun to attend an event like the Good Food & Wine Show (May), the real fun begins when you go to food and wine festivals in the winelands.
Harvest season runs from February on and is a great excuse to explore this region for several days.
Music festivals include Oppikoppi (August), Rocking the Daisies (September-October), Flamjangled Tea Party (March), and Greenpop’s ReforestFest (May), typically three-day events with live music and overnight camping.
For the more advanced festivalgoer, South Africa’s very own Burning Man festival, called Afrikaburn, is held in the Karoo desert annually.

Read More Local travel tips for Cape Town

The pace of life slows more than usual a couple of weeks before and after the Christmas holiday season.
Book the Robben Island ferry way in advance to avoid disappointment.
Table Mountain is cheaper in the summer, with the promotional “half-price after sunset” discount.
Three wineries is enough for a day of winetasting.
Any more than that, and you’re bound to feel overwhelmed (and by overwhelmed, we mean drunk).
Read More What’s on in Cape Town Cape Town Bicycle Maps South African National ParksCape Nature Read More How to Immerse Yourself in Cape Town’s Vibrant Art Scene.
The opening of the highly anticipated Zeitz Museum is just the tip of the artsy iceberg.
For an Intimate Look at South Africa’s Booming Art Scene, Head to the Townships.
Artists from the districts are turning their own homes into welcoming galleries and workshops and providing a much more [.

] Get the Inside Scoop on Cape Town’s New Zeitz MOCAA

How to Weekend in Cape Town’s Wine Country

Entrepreneur Rashiq Fataar on Cape Town’s Natural Side

In the Kitchen With South African Top Chef Reuben Riffel.
The Best Hotels in Cape Town.

The Best Restaurants in Cape Town

The Best Bars in Cape Town.
The Best Things to Do in Cape Town.
The Best Shops in Cape Town.
more about Cape Town 8 of the Best Botanical Gardens Around the World Why the New Nonstop to Cape Town Will Change My Life—and Yours Finally, Nonstop Flights From United States to Cape Town Are Coming Emirates Has $878 Flights for Two This Valentine’s Day—but You’ll Have to Act Fast Cape Town Celebrates Nelson Mandela’s Legacy With Powerful Tributes and Landmark Trail Cape Town Is in a Massive Drought—Here’s Why You Should Still Visit Updated: 11/19/19 Ted Botha is the author of Mongo: Adventures in Trash, The Girl with the Crooked Nose, and the novel The Animal Lover.
He has written for numerous publications, including The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Wall Street Journal, Condé Nast Traveler, and Outside.
He is completing a nonfiction thriller, the untold story of a series of movie spectacles and murders that took place in the 1920s.
He lives between New York City and Johannesburg.
Marie Frei hails from Connecticut, but she feels most at home while on safari in the African bush.
With her background in the travel industry and experience living abroad, she is most interested in how the right balance of conservation and tourism can benefit both the people and wildlife of Africa.
She is an avid photographer and writer, and shares her experiences and inspiration on her website, One Carry-On Travel.
Read More.